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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
to have full employment, given that? we did not have large budget deficits. what makes it so much harder? and it's adding up. it gives the persistent trade deficit. we used to not have one and now we do, and it is a big drag on the economy. the trade deficit is significantly down. we have had some -- the u.s. has actually become more competitive, but that's a front on which we need to work. there is a -- the trouble is the political debate has not kept up with the reality. at it all about china. actually, china is no longer the core of that. it's a much broader set of countries. those need to be work on. i hope the next president, instead of not just crude china bashing but what to do to have a world that is no -- we don't have everybody trying to run a trade surplus, which the germans believe is possible but the rest of us don't. then the issue of trade and income inequality, and a lot of -- used to be we traded with countries that were similar. and that presumably had relatively effect on income. if you make -- if you send auto parts to canada and conditioned sends assembled cars back
rate will necessarily go up. we talk about debt and deficit in this chamber, if we remember less than 12 years ago, 12 years ago we hit a budgetary surplus of $258 billion. meaning that we were taking in $258 billion more in each year than we were spending. how was that possible? it was made possible by having created 22 million private sector jobs in the previous eight years. . what was the policy then? the policy was to invest in the american economy, in the american people, in education, in scientific research, and infrastructure. so i think the lessons from our most recent past are very instructive today as to what we should be doing in washington to promote growth. the gentleman from california spoke of a plan i was working on, that's a $1.2 trillion investment in rebuilding the roads and bridges of america. that plan, advanced by the new america foundation, would create 27 million private sector jobs in five years. the first year alone, over five million jobs which would reduce the current employment rate from where it is today to 6.4% and in the second year, 5.2%. now public in
that was as efficient we would have no deficit given the baby boom. >> >> it is actually called medicare. with the supreme act the of of, so all of these same of, so all of these same this but our budget problems will be done. >> cell it better dismantle. it is incredible. it is a rejection of theory and evidence. [laughter] that is pretty impressive. >> host: look at the interface between medical costs and the budget. the idea we have to have commissions like bowles simpson with the shares between spending and so forth. why don't we look at that in the eye? >> the riyal abbate of merck can -- american. the insurance industry is very influential. if you take one provision but to provide for egyptian dragon's for medicare. >> if anybody is serious about but we are they talked about i think health care reform should. medicare for all is where we should go broke teach teetwenty three. we had this plan is in an good to get to the effects of the single carrier system we should have a public option. then the public our action is killed. >> but right now is to establish the principle of univers
box and reduce the deficit, they spent it. he has no savings in his budget. he wants to count savings because he is not in iraq anymore. they threw him out. that is why he is not in iraq anymore. connell: we will obviously come back to this over and over again. grover norquist, thank you. dagen: we will stay on the topic of warren buffett and taxes. should the cut off the $500,000 not $250,000 as the president wants. would that ease some of the burden and pain of higher taxes? >> on one level it would, of course. raising that threshold from $250,000 to $500,000. the buffet idea maybe release a little bit of pain, but does nothing to address the extortions that he is talking about. huge distortions. 160,000 pages of distortions in the tax code. you were talking about a tiny, tiny improvement. i will take it, sure. we are getting distracted on this one. dagen: connell was talking about a minimum tax on the wealthy. he starts out $1 billion a year. 30%. a good idea in the abstract? then he starts talking about his brother in. those are multi billionaires, dude. >> i mean, i think these a
deficits close to 4% to 5% over the next decade and that's cbo forecasts. if that occurs, you're talk about the debt getting more and more out of control. because the u.s. is the global reserve council, it's reliant on global reserve investment. >> just want to make sure that people have enough treasuries to trade. that's all it's about, charles. isn't that very generous? >> it is very generous. but left unaddressed, the fiscal problem is beginning to be a problem. but equally they don't want the full hit at this stage. so it is a matter of coming to some compromise, so you are going to have to see some kind of adjustment on the taxation side. that is what everyone is hopeful for. but it's still a political game. >> and we've been burned before. let's recap in the meantime a couple of developments in europe overnight. the european commission is expected to approve the restructuring plans of spags's na -- spain's national lenders today. a token price of -- yes -- one euro. the valencia-based lank was one of four to be nationalized in the past 12 months. and hundreds of greek workers marched
deficit right now. it is the bridge to renewable energy, renewable energy will take a long time. if we can move to gas we get tremendous benefits in terms of cleaner energy on the way to renewable energy future. if we could get those things done, steve, this would be transformational for our economy but we have not been able to act on these things even though i said earlier there is wide bipartisan -- >> thank you. let me just try to poke holes in this. if we rollback time to just before the financial crisis you look at the u.s. deposition. douglas holtz-eakin was out there talking about that already. and john mccain and others have been but it is much worse today but if you look at the deck in a different way, look at private sector debt, the fact, forget government debt. before the financial crisis private-sector debt was 160% of gdp in the united states and despite averaging, back to 160% of gdp we are still in crisis mode, you had structural corruption between regulators and financial institutions and any place in the economy and a private sector event that led to a government response
in interest rates, $2.4 billion we take in. there's a $1.1 billion deficit. if that keeps up -- >> trillion. you're talking trillion-dollar deficits every year. >> if that keeps up, the spending goes to $6 billion. what we take in goes to $4.6 billion. you have a $1.4 billion deficit you're going to deal with in ten years with $1 trillion debt. interest payments you have to make every year. when you're making interest payments of $1 trillion a year, everybody is going to stop investing. germany isn't going to buy our bonds anymore. >> maybe they want this. it seems like both sides are digging in. the president says he wants $ .6 trillion in revenue. that means higher taxes as well as taking the loopholes away. maybe he wants to go over the cliff to prove a point. >> going over the cliff to prove a point is like wrecking your car to show that you can't drive. i mean, it doesn't make any sense. what makes sense is to be thoughtful. a democrats and a republican two years ago, simpson/bowles, got together and put together some guidelines that nobody paid any attention to. it had to do with heal
-0 deficit. 21-14 late in the game, but lincoln comes back to score the two-point conversion by tyree. 22-21! >> we worked hard from the beginning. all we did, all the fighting, we were torn. and it's great to happen! >> i'm very proud of this team. we've been through ups and downs, injuries all year. i love my team! >> last week, we said, hey, we're gonna eat some turkey. we're gonna be champions. >> who would have won? we would have never did it! >> right. all right. nfl, 49er business. quarterback alex smith practiced today. he reportedly has been medically cleared to play, but the team is denying it. so is it colin kaepernick at center in new orleans? jim harbaugh speaks tomorrow afternoon at niner headquarters. >>> hey, did you hear? it's thanksgiving! right place, right time, in the woodside high school. runs it back for a touchdown. he scored six in the last two games. 49-19. they get the best of the jets. >>> college basketball, cal up. richard solomon. no foul called. he gets teed up. moments later, mike montgomery gets up. bears trailed by as much as eight but they come on back.
is that although it's running a primary deficit, actual servicing makes if worse. so one thing you can do is take away some of the debt burden to enable them to try to get the economy back into some sort of primary surface situation. but imagine we have a baby crawling across the floor and it keeps crawling away from us. we're picking up up the baby and bringing it back closer to us, but it's still crawling. so as soon as you put it down, it's heads off back where it came from. so the real problem with greece, they say the good news is we'll stay in the euro. really? the problem for greece is that greece in the euro appears to be uncompetitive. you either come out of the euro, and you have big significant drop in the value of your currency so everything that you do, no one would seem there is much change in import costs, but suddenly everything in greece is more than competitive. but if you stay, instead of the currency dropping 0%, every person's salary has dropped 30%. so this gets much, much harder. >> it's clear the internal devaluation is much more difficult, but also that it has been happen
out of their pockets to his deficit reduction. so we've had thoughts of things squeezing us at different levels. we are now facing biggest threat through sequestered. janet mentioned the fiscal cliff in one part of the fiscal cliff is these across-the-board spending cuts to take effect january 2nd. it's going to be an 8.2% across-the-board cut in education, job training and health, housing, fbi, air traffic controllers from the food safety, entire range of domestic programs. for education if you count headstart, which is at the department of health and human services a $4.8 billion cut would be the largest education cuts ever in the history of the country. that would just move us -- essentially move us backwards on whether the goal is closing achievement gaps come increasing high school graduation rates, increasing college access and college completion. our biggest challenge in the short-term this lame-duck lame-duck session this to work together with groups like the urban league and national council to come up with a balanced approach to deficit reduction. as genocide, as p
budget is on an unsustainable path. the budget deficit which peaked at about 10% of gdp in 2009 and now is 7% of gdp is expected to narrow further in the coming years as the economy continues to recover. the cbo projects that under a plausible set of assumptions, the budget deficit would still be greater than 4% of gdp in 2018, assuming the economy has returned with potential by then. moreover, under the cbo projection, could deficit and raise your federal debt to gdp would subsequently returned to an upward trend. we should all understand that long-term projections of ever increasing deficits will never actually come to pass because the willingness of plunder to continue to fund the government can only be sustained by irresponsible fiscal plans and actions. host: that was ben bernanke at the economic club of new york yesterday. looking for your confidence in the u.s. economy. already getting some comments on facebook -- abroad we are taking your comments on twitter, facebook, and calls. we start with joseph from maryland on the democratic line. thanks for joining us. caller: good morni
and says the end for hp is not even sight. >>> also, japan has posted its worst trade deficit in october for more than three decades. exports dropped sharply amid territorial tensions between tokyo and beijing. it indicates the world's third biggest economy is inching closer to recession. this means the country would have seen its fifth technical recession in 15 years. at the same time, japan's opposition party promised a massive easing blitz meant to pull the economy out of its funk. that's if the ldp returns to power on december 16th. he promised to compile a large extra budget. he's also it rated calls to lift calls above the 1% target. >> translator: we should target inflation of 2% to 3%. i prefer 3%, but i will leave that up to the experts. i have never said the boj should directly buy bonds from the government. they should buy them from the market. >> his party is also considering the revision of the bank of japan law. yesterday the bank of japan chief hit back saying it was unrealistic. >>> just the latest in japan. let's get the market report kicked off by sixuan. >> let me star
to be sitting on the sidelines and lose jobs. we've seen. that our manufacturing goods, trade deficit has gone up. >> that might be true that some play dirty, with don't we as well snt risk becomes that we encourage mal investment. all the things that make the united states unique and special over the past 100-odd years in the economy and that's innovation. and that's resilience had to do little with subsidies. little with special treatment but rather equal playing field. let's not corrupt what is made special to play dirty to keep up with the dirty players. >> i'm not suggest we go play dirty. i disagree with your economic history a little bit. every successful industry that's been incubated in the united states has been subsidized like sems and you can go back to the telegraph and find. that i think we have a differing view of economic history. but what i'm suggesting is this, someone's going to make cars for consumers in the united states. i'd like to see them made here. japan, korea, china, germany, they all have manufacturing strategies. if we don't have one, and i think -- i don't think
of the deficit. that's an economic fact. >> we've been open to revenue by closinging loopholes as long as it's tied to spending cuts. >> as long as it's mitt romney's plan. that's what we're for. >> stephanie: what? you're acting like, it's almost like a hostage crisis. like they don't have the gun and are issuing demands. like what? >> what are you talking about? >> stephanie: exactly. mike in philadelphia, you're on the "stephanie miller show." hi, mike. >> caller: hi, steph how are you doing? >> stephanie: good, go ahead. >> caller: eric con tore brought obamacare back on the table. they won't leave that alone. >> stephanie: no, they are just the sorest losers in the world. it's like he won he won at the supreme court he won at the ballot box again moving on, we are not repealing obamacare. like really? the white house warned monday that american consumers will spend $200 billion less if the looming fiscal cliff is not averted and tax hikes are not spread across the board. the economy would take a hit of $500 billion, probably sending the country back boo recession. i get what the white h
economic path. barry goldwater said tax cuts yes, the deficit reduction first. you have to baby bells. d. -- pay the bills. in your personal and public life -- you want to have a prescription drug benefits under medicare, that is great, you have to pay for it. you once two wars? you have to pay for them, too. we should understand something about the republican party over the last and years. it has been a big spending party -- it just does not want to pay for any of the spending. a reset of traditional conservatism requires that we be reality-based on the fiscal condition of the country and understand that the years of profligacy now require increased revenue. the notion that we have hundreds of members of congress bound by a pledge to grover norquist as opposed to their oath of office to the constitution -- [applause] is unsettling. we should understand, there is not symmetry between the parties on this question. there is no grover norquist equivalent in the democratic party on this question. it is encouraging to hear speaker banner and republicans talk about the -- speaker boehner and r
of the issue. >>> in global market news, japan logging its fourth straight trade deficit in october. the european debt crisis with china over a territorial dispute actually reduced exports. and we continue to follow the latest developments out of the middle east. secretary of state hillary clinton traveled to the west bank this morning to meet with palestinian president mahmoud abbas. abbas heads the west bank, while the palestinian militant group hamas controls the gaza strip. hamas is considered a terrorist organization by the united states because it continues to refuse to recognize israel as a state. the united states has a policy of not negotiating with terrorist organizations. that's why she's not speaking with anyone in gaza. her visit comes hours after a meeting with israeli officials that lasted late into the night. >>> let's take a look at the markets this morning. we already showed you the futures. they are down slightly. dow futures down by about 23 points. in europe this morning, you'll see that -- also, by the way, a lot happened yesterday. ben bernanke started talking
manufacturing goods trade deficit has gone up. >> that might be true that some play dirty, why don't we as well. the risk is we encourage malinvestment. all these things made unique and special in the last 100 years in the economy, and that's innovation, that's resilience. had little to do with subsidies, but rather a unique playing field. let's not corrupt what's made dirty to keep up with the dirty players. >> i'm not suggesting we play dirty, and i disagree with your economic history a little bit. every successful history that's been incubated in the united states has been in yonurtured. someone makes cars in the united states. i'd like to see them made here. china, germany, japan, they all have car manufacturing. i think it should be smart, i think it should be sophisticated, i think it should be based on incentives and what the private sector wants. you can control that manufacturing. that's why ford is bringing manufacturing of the fusion back to the united states. it's why gm is bringing back some of its functions from india to michigan. it's why you've seen lenovo bring laptop manufactu
to energy independence. that is a $200 billion deficit right now. it is a bridge to renewable energy. if we can move to gas, we will get tremendous benefits in terms of a cleaner energy on a way to a renewable energy future. if we could get those things done, this to be transformational for our economy, but we cannot act on these things even though there is a lot of bipartisan agreement. >> let me just try to poke holes in this. if we rolled back time to just before the financial crisis. look at the u.s.. doug holtz-eakin was out there bitching about that already. it's much worse today. if you look at debt in a different way. if you look at private-sector debt -- just forget government debt. private-sector debt was 160% of gdp. despite the myths of the leveraging, today we are back in that same crisis mode. you also have structural corruption and between regulators, financial institutions and other players in the economy and you have a private sector events leading to a government response. my question is why is it never on this list to get the private sector robber control? there is nothin
we need other than taxing the rich? >> we need a framework so you can look and see the deficit is coming down to near zero. that's what we need. >> where do we get the money on the spending side? >> well, first, on the taxes in addition to raising the tax rates, what we're going to start hearing much more about is the unbelievable tax gimmicks. i just want to say, but, joe, one thing about that, if i could. >> where is the spending coming from? >> i want to say one thing about that that's funny. go google and some of our other biggest companies have been hiding profits for years from the irs. with the irs' approval, putting it in bermuda and so forth. now europe is saying, because they use european con duets, okay, we'll tax that. no, that's money that should be taxed by the united states. stow if we continue our gimmicks we're going to lose it to europeans. >> so we have to raise rates and we have to cut loopholes. what about on the spending side? where do we get the money there? >> we're going to have to get defense under control and spend these wasteful wars have added trill
that these kids and families and our clinics in seeing the major education deficit on the fields today in all sports frankly, but also seeing the outcomes. some of the things that raise talking about in terms of understanding forces is really important and we just completed some work in developing measures they are using so we can understand their cognitive symptom kinds of effects of these to kids. i think that's very, very important outcome to what we need to link up with the games. from the perspective -- actually was at the aspen institute this summer, where u.s. nabobs question about, should we be eliminating football -- tackling a football before the age of 14. at that point i couldn't speak, although we did speak that night. one of the things i said as we've got to change things. in its current form of credit problem. although the age limit is something that has to be further studied here it is going to finish my comments with research, but maybe starts with research in trying to understand what evidence do we have. one of the things that is hopeful that i've seen in sports like footba
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)